Altering Your Play With the Count

Once you know basic strategy very well and once you can count all the cards played without difficulty, you are ready for the next step, altering your play with the count at the website: https://casinoslots-sa.co.za/rich-casino.  Although your advantage over the house will increase using play variations, it is not essential to make money, and is not advised if you are still learning to count.

In certain cases, knowledge as to the cards remaining make it favourable to change your normal play.  As an example, you would hit stiffs less often when more high cards remain and more often when more low cards remain.  Again, the calculations have been made for you and the results are included in tables below.  The table numbers are called strike numbers. You should deviate from your normal play whenever the true count equals or exceeds the strike number.

Unless you have a photographic memory, I would suggest learning the most common play variations and forget about the others.  The large numbers as well as the variations of the split strategy will rarely be used in casino play.  The most important number is sixteen against a ten, which is a play that you will face often.  The strike number of zero means that you stand if the true count equals or exceeds the strike value.  The most important play variations are highlighted in the table. Of course, if you want to progress past a weekend player then you should know them all.

Play Variations – Multiple Deck

double after split
dealer stands on soft 17

Deviate from basic strategy if the count per deck equals or exceeds the matrix numbers.HIT / STAND DECISIONS
Your Hand Dealer’s Card
. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X A
16 . . . . . . . . 0 .
15 . . . . . . . . +4 .
14 -4 -5 . . . . . . . .
13 -1 -2 -3 -5 -5 . . . . .
12 +3 +1 0 -2 -1 . . . . .
DOUBLE DOWN DECISIONS
Your Hand Dealer’s Card
. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X A
11 . . . . . . . . -5 +1
10 . . . . . . -5 -2 +3 +4
9 +1 -1 -3 -5 . +4 . . . .
8 . . . +4 +2 . . . . .
A,9 . . . +5 +5 . . . . .
A,8 . +4 +3 +1 +1 . . . . .
A,7 0 -2 -4 . . . . . . .
A,6 +1 -3 -5 . . . . . . .
A,5 . +3 -2 . . . . . . .
A,4 . . 0 -5 . . . . . .
A,3 . . +3 -2 -5 . . . . .
A,2 . . +4 +1 -2 . . . . .
PAIR SPLIT DECISIONS
Your Hand Dealer’s Card
. 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X A
A,A . . . . . . . . . -3
X,X . . . +5 +5 . . . . .
9,9 -3 -4 -5 . . +2 . . . +3
8,8 . . . . . . . . . .
7,7 . . . . . . +4 . . .
6,6 -2 -4 -5 . . . . . . .
5,5 . . . . . . -5 -2 +3 +4
4,4 . . +3 -1 -4 . . . . .
3,3 0 . . . . . . . . .
2,2 -4 . . . . . . . . .
Insurance: +3

Suggested Books

Million Dollar Blackjack by Ken Uston, Secaucus, Carol Publishing Group, 1981
A very interesting book that, in my opinion, teaches you the mindset required to make money at blackjack.  This book jumps back and forth from card counting theory to fascinating stories of how he and his teams won millions.  Please note that in his subsequent book, “Ken Uston on Blackjack”, Uston states that the added advantage of keeping a side count of aces is not worth the effort.

Ken Uston on Blackjack by Ken Uston, Secaucus, Lyle Stuart Inc., 1986
An update to his previous book, that contains more current examples of casino conditions and methods of play.  You must read carefully to get grasp his quick statements where he states that recent evidence uncovered revels that – the more complicated count systems which he recommends in his first book are not worth the effort for the average or even above average player.

The Theory of Blackjack by Peter A. Griffin*, Faculty Publishing, Third Edition, 1986
Written by a math professor, this book is an excellent explanation of the theory of blackjack.  I would recommend this book if you have a serious interest in understanding the game, and if you have an above average understanding of math, but not if it is the only book you plan to read.

Professional Blackjack by Stanford Wong, Las Vegas, GBC Press, 1977
Standford Wong is probably the leading authority on the mathematical interpretation of games of chance.  This is an excellent book, but it is a bit dry for the person that is not interested in detailed mathematical theory.  By the way, Standford Wong is not his real name and he isn’t even Chinese.

Turning the Tables on Las Vegas by Ian Anderson, New York, Vanguard, 1976

Blackbelt in Blackjack by Arnold Snyder, Berkeley, RGE Publishing

Beat the Dealer by E.O. Thorp, New York, Random House, 1966
The original work that started the ball rolling.  Informative, but it’s systems and casino descriptions are out of date.